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Prepare for a career in Product Innovation and Design or Welding and Materials Joining.

“We feel that there’s a lot of times a perception that manufacturing is predominantly a male role, and it’s important that our female students see women doing these roles and doing them well.”

Tara Kaitfors
CTE Business Engagement Coordinator

Overview

Pathways in the Manufacturing and Product Development sector prepare graduates to work in manufacturing as welders, CNC machinists, industrial designers, robotics engineers, and more.

Students may have the opportunity to receive college credit and industry recognized certifications as well as participate in paid and unpaid internships.

Manufacturing and Product Development

Sample Manufacturing Courses

WBL Computer Integrated Manufacturing is the concentrator course for the Manufacturing Technology Product Innovation and Design Linked Learning Pathway at Duncan Polytechnical High School. This course provides students with an understanding of the design and manufacturing technologies common to careers in the fields of product design and manufacturing. Topics include the product design and development process, the principles of design, computer-aided design, fabrication and manufacturing processes, sustainability, and computer-aided manufacturing. Students will gain proficiency in the setup, programming, and operation of computer numerically controlled (CNC) manufacturing equipment, with an emphasis on the Haas control system, to work toward earning industry-recognized certifications. Students will learn foundational skills necessary for manufacturing such as machine shop safety, applied mathematics, precision measurements, calculation of feeds and speeds, and print reading.

WBL3 Computer Integrated Mechatronics is the capstone course that focuses on the principles of physics, energy conservation, electronic sensing, computerized data acquisition, and automated process control used in the production of manufactured products. In this inquiry-grounded, project-based learning course, students become manufacturing teams, designing, analyzing, and building systems that automate processes to manufacture products. An understanding of systems is emphasized, as students consolidate abilities with regards to appropriate selection, operational commissioning, and careful maintenance of automated technical systems. Students are encouraged to apply basic design and operational principles to express themselves intelligibly and precisely using correct technical terms and symbols. Students learn about electromechanical systems through experience with all the senses. Students use program logic controller, sensors, manufacturing components, and computer models to study how product can be collected, measured, and processed by coding and designing efficient automated electromechanical systems. Using their understanding of product manufacturing design, students identify the inefficiencies in local industrial electromechanical systems and develop plans to mitigate them. This course is being articulated for college credit with Clovis Community College.

Welding Fabrication I is the concentrator course for the Welding Fabrication Pathway at Duncan Polytechnical High School. In this course, students learn the knowledge and skills relating to the transfer of matter and energy through electrical, fluid, thermal, and mechanical systems. Various welding processes will be explored on a flat, horizontal plane. Students will be eligible for industry certifications in the various processes. Students will explore professional opportunities in the field of welding fabrication. Students will qualify for college credit through Dual Enrollment with the State Center Community College District. Additionally, this course may be a gateway program for those students interested in pursuing a post-secondary study in mechanical or structural engineering.

WBL Welding Fabrication II is the capstone course for the Welding Fabrication pathway at Duncan Polytechnical High School. In this course, students will apply the knowledge and skills relating to the transfer of matter and energy through electrical, fluid, thermal, and mechanical systems. They will also study more advanced fundamentals of mechanical and structural systems and facilities. Students will explore professional opportunities in the field of welding fabrication. More advanced welding processes, such as Flux-Cored Arc welding and Gas Tungstun Arc welding will be explored, and previously covered processes will be learned “out of position” including overhead and vertical welding positions. Students will be eligible for industry certifications in the various processes. Students will explore professional opportunities in the field of welding fabrication. Students will qualify for college credit through Dual Enrollment with the State Center Community College District. Additionally, this course may be a gateway program for those students interested in pursuing a post-secondary study in mechanical or structural engineering.

This course will expose students to the career readiness skills needed for a successful internship and prepare them for the world of work. An internship is a work-based learning experience that provides students the opportunity to apply their technical and academic skills in a professional setting. Students will develop and practice an understanding of the duties and responsibilities of high-skilled career areas, including terminology, climate, protocol, and other information that will enable them to analyze and revise their meaningful future plans. This course will expose students to the career readiness skills needed for a successful internship and prepare them for the world of work. The internship is supported with activities and assignments to deepen and enhance the experience. The structure of the internship aligns with local policy and program expectations for internships.

This course will expose students to the career readiness skills needed for a successful internship and prepare them for the world of work. An internship is a work-based learning experience that provides students the opportunity to apply their technical and academic skills in a professional setting. Students will develop and practice an understanding of the duties and responsibilities of high-skilled career areas, including terminology, climate, protocol, and other information that will enable them to analyze and revise their meaningful future plans. This course will expose students to the career readiness skills needed for a successful internship and prepare them for the world of work. The internship is supported with activities and assignments to deepen and enhance the experience. The structure of the internship aligns with local policy and program expectations for internships.

Note: Course availability varies by school and program.

Examples of Manufacturing Careers

OccupationEducation LevelMedian Annual Earnings in CA
CAD/CAM Programmer or CNC MachinistPostsecondary certificate$72,720
Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) Tool OperatorHigh school diploma or equivalent$42,640
Industrial DesignerBachelor's degree$80,620
Industrial Production ManagerBachelor's degree$116,100
Manufacturing EngineerBachelor's degree$101,720
Robotics EngineerBachelor's degree$113,510
Tool and Die MakerPostsecondary certificate$61,820
Welder, Cutter, Solderer, and BrazerHigh school diploma or equivalent$45,930

Source: US Dept of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics for California

Innovative Design and Applied Technology Academy (IDATA)

Manufacturing and Welding are programs offered exclusively at Duncan Polytechnical High School.

Manufacturing and Product Development

Students learn various manufacturing skills such as machining, programming, and product development. Students have the opportunity to earn several industry certifications, including OSHA-10, National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS), credentials in CNC milling and CNC turning, and Safety and Pollution Prevention Training (S/P2). College credit, internships, and apprenticeships are also offered through the program. Graduates can go straight to work in entry-level positions.

Welding Fabrication

Students learn to hand weld, flame cut, hand solder, and more, in order to prepare for careers building or repairing machinery, heavy equipment, pipes, and even ships. Through hands-on projects, students learn different types of arc welding, CNC plasma cutting, and oxy-acetylene welding, brazing, and cutting. Students have the opportunity to earn several industry certifications, including OSHA-10, American Welding Society (AWS) and Safety and Pollution Prevention Training (S/P2). College credit, internships, and apprenticeships are also offered through the program. Graduates can go straight to work in entry-level positions.

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